Gulf Fritillary Butterfly; Agraulis vanillae

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Gulf Fritillary Butterfly Page Two
Agraulis vanillae
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar molted
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar larva
A Gulf Fritillary larva eats its skin after molting
A small Gulf Fritillary caterpillar
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar larva
Variegated Fritillary butterfly caterpillar molted
Gulf Fritillary caterpillar is orange with black 'hair'.
Although it may look scary, it cannot sting.
A Variegated Fritillary caterpillar boasts white specks
and shares the same host plant, passionvine.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar orange with black hair
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar orange with black hair
Ants are attracted to passionvine,
the Gulf Fritillary host plant.
A caterpillar hangs in a 'J' preparing to pupate.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) caterpillar pupating
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) pupa chrysalis
Shortly before pupation, its skin becomes clear.
Fully pupated, a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar
has now become a pupa, or chrysalis.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) with split proboscis
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae)  proboscis>
When the adult butterfly emerges, its proboscis is in two sections. If it does not bring the sections together, it will live its short life with a split proboscis. A split proboscis makes life hard for a butterfly as drinking nectar from a flower becomes difficult if not impossible.
The proboscis is kept tightly curled
unless the butterfly is drinking nectar
or other liquid.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) drinks nectar
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) drinks nectar
Three Gulf Fritillaries drink nectar from zinnias
Yellow lantana is a favorite of butterflies. Six Gulf Fritillaries are in this photograph drinking nectar from lantana.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) with pollen
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) drinks sweat
A Gulf Fritillary is covered
with pollen after drinking nectar.
Butterflies drink other 'food' than nectar.
This Gulf Fritillary is drinking sweat from my hand
after I had been wiping my face while videoing
in the garden for an hour.
This photo is not staged, it chose to land on me
and stayed with me about ten minutes.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) drinks dog poop
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) drinks dog food
A fresh pile of dog poop (manure)
is a feast for this butterfly.
Butterflies also eat dead animals.
Dog food moist from dew creates a meal
for something other than the dog.
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) scales
Gulf Fritillary Butterfly (Agraulis vanillae) rest roost
Scales on the outside of a Gulf Fritillary's
wings come off with a slight touch.
The shiny silver scales admidst the orange and black
scales create an attractive pattern.
A Gulf Fritillary waits for the morning sun to dry dewdrops from it's wings, antennae, and body.

Click here for to return to page one of the Gulf Fritillary lifecycle.